Thoughts on home…

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THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

 
The house I grew up in has been torn down. No great loss, really–a cinderblock structure Daddy built by hand, it lacked indoor plumbing until I was two. I remember more about the surrounding woods than the house.
What I remember is my grandparents’. Old, old places–the oldest house in Mt. Lakes, New Jersey belonged to my paternal grandparents. Two hundred fifty years of atmosphere met you at the door. Or the big brown 20’s bungalow that belonged to my mom’s folks.
I collected dream houses on every trip to town, my nose pressed against the passenger window. I populated my collected mansions with wealthy families with five daughters apiece, each with three syllable names: Jessica, Jennifer, Genevieve (this, back when every friend this only child had was either Debbie or Linda.) They wore pleated dresses and sat on seats in front of casement windows, when they weren’t running down winding stairs to collect invitations passed through the brass slot in the front door.
Then some real houses came along. The house where we raised the boys still stands in Ohio; we were only its fourth family in a hundred years. I’ve moved on to my own bungalow, a place that suits me so perfectly it takes my breath away. I am so thankful.
I was then, and am now, looking for slices of home. A banister here, a window there, I collect pictures in more file folders than I like to admit I own. I understand the old Brook Benton song about the boll weevil who was “lookin’ for a home.” I love the patriarch Abraham, who sought “a city that hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God.” For some, it’s a beach or a creek or a mountain, but for me, it’s always a house. A friend in college wrote a song she titled “The Living Room of God’s Love,” and that’s where I want to live. The house is just the box that represents heaven until I get there.

Looking at a long post.

This is not plagiarism, I am copying this from an article from TechCrunch.com. I am just finding some text to make a long post to see how it looks.

Apple and Google are enemies and partners at the same time due to asymmetric competition. According to a report from Morgan Stanley, Google could pay more than $1 billion in 2014 to remain the default search engine on iOS. In 2009, Google paid only $82 million for the privilege. Analyst Scott Devitt believes that it is a per-device deal growing every year.

According to the report titled “The Next Google Is Google” and the table below, the total traffic acquisition cost is somewhat proportional to the number of iOS unit sales, with a traffic acquisition cost rate slowly going up from $3.2 per unit last year to an estimated $3.3 per unit this year and $3.5 per unit next year. That’s why the total traffic acquisition cost is going to increase in the coming years if iOS sales keep growing.

To put it into perspective, the Mozilla Foundation should get $400 million in 2014. Google remains the main contributor to the organization as one can read in Mozilla’s reports. Opera is another longstanding partner, but Morgan Stanley doesn’t give figures for this deal.

Over the years, Apple has gotten more revenue from Google as Microsoft has been pushing very hard and bidding to make Bing the default search engine. For example, Bing is now the default provider on Nokia and BlackBerry devices. Money is a major incentive for Apple. But selling aGoogle-free iPhone could dictate the company’s next move.

Yet, Apple shouldn’t shy away from $1 billion. As a company, profit is the most important metric. Google provides an easy way for the company to cash in a significant sum of money every year. At the same time, Google pays more money to Apple than it directly generates from iOS users. But user data is worth a lot. With only $2.9 billion in profit last quarter, it’s a non-negligible way to affect Google’s bottom line.

But the smartphone space evolves very rapidly. As Samsung is now the dominant manufacturer, the Apple-Google deal could peak soon. Google will watch closely how market shares change and could end the deal or lower its terms at the first opportunity.

 

How about now? Even longer!

 

Apple and Google are enemies and partners at the same time due to asymmetric competition. According to a report from Morgan Stanley, Google could pay more than $1 billion in 2014 to remain the default search engine on iOS. In 2009, Google paid only $82 million for the privilege. Analyst Scott Devitt believes that it is a per-device deal growing every year.

According to the report titled “The Next Google Is Google” and the table below, the total traffic acquisition cost is somewhat proportional to the number of iOS unit sales, with a traffic acquisition cost rate slowly going up from $3.2 per unit last year to an estimated $3.3 per unit this year and $3.5 per unit next year. That’s why the total traffic acquisition cost is going to increase in the coming years if iOS sales keep growing.

To put it into perspective, the Mozilla Foundation should get $400 million in 2014. Google remains the main contributor to the organization as one can read in Mozilla’s reports. Opera is another longstanding partner, but Morgan Stanley doesn’t give figures for this deal.

Over the years, Apple has gotten more revenue from Google as Microsoft has been pushing very hard and bidding to make Bing the default search engine. For example, Bing is now the default provider on Nokia and BlackBerry devices. Money is a major incentive for Apple. But selling aGoogle-free iPhone could dictate the company’s next move.

Yet, Apple shouldn’t shy away from $1 billion. As a company, profit is the most important metric. Google provides an easy way for the company to cash in a significant sum of money every year. At the same time, Google pays more money to Apple than it directly generates from iOS users. But user data is worth a lot. With only $2.9 billion in profit last quarter, it’s a non-negligible way to affect Google’s bottom line.

But the smartphone space evolves very rapidly. As Samsung is now the dominant manufacturer, the Apple-Google deal could peak soon. Google will watch closely how market shares change and could end the deal or lower its terms at the first opportunity.